Sunday 20 April 2014


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162Monday, 14 April 2014 03:10
Debbie

How do you start an online game?

161Wednesday, 12 March 2014 11:34
Vitaly
World and European championships provide ideal space for maneuvring, both in terms of number of sessions and participants. Purely random (still with constraint of team or country) scheme does not seem to reasonable at all -- though to use it as a part of any other scheme looks acceptable. IMHO, best scenario is: equally-matched scheme to days 1-2, then top 20-25% struggle within a group for prizes + side-event for the rest of players.
160Wednesday, 12 March 2014 10:09
Vitaly
But what about the idea to split a tournaments in two at certain point? (One can use "stepping", for instance, cut top-24 after session 4, then top-16 after next session, then top-12 etc.).
In ma-any other sports it is quite acceptable that "toppers" play THEIR event fighting for the prizes while all others may play in "side-event" which still may gather a bunch of players (and may be processed separately, with lower MERS coefficient).
And, surely, such schemes are pointless for 1-day events.
159Wednesday, 12 March 2014 09:57
Vitaly
Second day may require more time between session to organise proper sitting. Please, be careful here, "more" in this case means that 15 min is no good though 20-30 minutes is quite acceptable. Current software provides "no-problems" seating (say, in 5 min) for 6 sessions starting from 32 players, 8 sessions -- starting from 60 players. More players-sized 2-day events are welcome (they are easier to be calculated)!
158Wednesday, 12 March 2014 09:52
Vitaly
Now, let's move to "longer tournaments" as stated.
2-days event may use 6-10 sessions, depending on rules, transportation factor (somebody needs to catch a train?), cultural program etc. Sophisticated software (like RiTour.exe) may produce seating for the first 4 session right "on spot", so the first day is "clean" for organisers. Of cause, provided there is no protocol errors.

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money prizes mean trouble

personally I don't think money prizes would be a good incentive for many players, because substantial prizes would mean higher entry fees and we already hear people complaining about tournaments being too costly and Mah-Jongg getting a "sport for the rich" today... but even more important: As far as I can judge the situation, money prizes would devide the EMA countries! I don't know much about the probably quite different gambling legislations even across the EU, but for Germany I'd say, we just couldn't do that: As soon as there would be a notable money prize, we would need a ministerial permit over here (and 'notable' starts very low - definitely far below 100 €). Most probably we'd never get that permit - or at least there would be fees/taxes and heavy constraints, including: no minors allowed, no advertising in the internet or via telecommunications allowed (and with no invites via www or e-mail, who would come?). As long as Mah-Jongg tournaments according to MERS regulations are not officially approved as NOT to be a game of chance (and it is an open question, if the officials would be willing to differentiate between the very differing rule variants and 'applications' of the rules in terms of tournament regulations), the only way to avoid legal problems in Germany is NOT to have money prizes or even valuable prize items.
This is a comment on "Less interest in MCR tournaments?"


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