Wednesday 23 April 2014


Readers’ Comments

153Monday, 21 April 2014 14:33
Edwin Phua
I doubt we have to worry about this particular detail, because unless there are companies that sell such tables can ship worldwide and service such equipment, we will be unable to comply with this rule.

China itself has hundreds of brands, so only allowing some companies which meets its requirements provide tables for tournaments as an assurance seems reasonable.
152Monday, 21 April 2014 10:15
Senechal D.
If the WMCC plans on regulating the use of autodealers, could they publish a list? Also, what *authority* lets them decide table A is good, table B is bad? Have they had problems with Amos or Alban, and what exactly do they propose as a better alternative? --- Other than that, I suppose people who enjoy playing government rules now have the option to have fun playing simple government rules too. cough
151Monday, 21 April 2014 07:46
Edwin Phua
We have been following the changes to the main rules as well. This update (as well as the 2011 Chinese update) are mainly cosmetic in nature, as none of the rules have been significantly altered. A lot of problematic areas still exist in the fouls and penalties section without change, which have to be corrected via addenda released during each major competition, such as at WMC 2012, and at the recent China Mahjong Championship 2014.
150Monday, 21 April 2014 07:42
Edwin Phua
Probably, the major difference now is not actually the omission of several scoring elements, but the reduction of the winning requirement from 8 points to 6 points. This is probably concommittant with the omission of several important two-point scoring elements such as All Chows, All Simples, Seat Wind, and Round Wind.

Beginners may learn to play effectively within this system, but the full rules will be like a totally different system. Would habits learnt here be difficult to unlearn?
149Monday, 21 April 2014 07:39
Edwin Phua
We in Singapore have been analysing the new beginners' rules (the 'primary' rules) using the Chinese version which was released about two weeks earlier.

We are troubled by this new development, as we feel that the new beginners' rules may hinder learning of MCR rather than aid it. We feel that there are negative consequences in transitioning from this beginners' ruleset to the full ruleset for beginners.

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Chinese line up to see top internet mahjong painting

mahjongpainting

SHANGHAI - An exhibition featuring 30 oil paintings by Toronto-based Chinese artist Liu Yi has attracted thousands of viewers to line up at Shanghai Art Museum.Many of them have come to see the painting 2008 - Beijing, a portrait of four women playing mahjong and a girl watching.

The five figures are of different races and assume varied postures in a surreal environment.In the painting there is also a portrait of Mao Zedong's face on Chiang Kai-shek's head with Sun Yat-sen's moustache.It's believed a metaphor about international relations is buried in the image, although there are various interpretations.

Since 2006, the painting has flooded the internet and has garnered the third most clicks ever for a picture, after Da Vinci's Mona Lisa and Van Gogh's Starry Night.Liu probably didn't think that much during creation. But his solid Realistic painting skills and the dramatic tension of Modern Expressionism indeed makes him stand out as "the explorer between Surrealism and Pop Art", and an important figure of Magic Realism.His new book, Liu Yi - Behind the Work, was released at the exhibition on Feb 11. Readers can discover how the artist interprets his work.



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