Sunday 20 April 2014


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162Monday, 14 April 2014 03:10
Debbie

How do you start an online game?

161Wednesday, 12 March 2014 11:34
Vitaly
World and European championships provide ideal space for maneuvring, both in terms of number of sessions and participants. Purely random (still with constraint of team or country) scheme does not seem to reasonable at all -- though to use it as a part of any other scheme looks acceptable. IMHO, best scenario is: equally-matched scheme to days 1-2, then top 20-25% struggle within a group for prizes + side-event for the rest of players.
160Wednesday, 12 March 2014 10:09
Vitaly
But what about the idea to split a tournaments in two at certain point? (One can use "stepping", for instance, cut top-24 after session 4, then top-16 after next session, then top-12 etc.).
In ma-any other sports it is quite acceptable that "toppers" play THEIR event fighting for the prizes while all others may play in "side-event" which still may gather a bunch of players (and may be processed separately, with lower MERS coefficient).
And, surely, such schemes are pointless for 1-day events.
159Wednesday, 12 March 2014 09:57
Vitaly
Second day may require more time between session to organise proper sitting. Please, be careful here, "more" in this case means that 15 min is no good though 20-30 minutes is quite acceptable. Current software provides "no-problems" seating (say, in 5 min) for 6 sessions starting from 32 players, 8 sessions -- starting from 60 players. More players-sized 2-day events are welcome (they are easier to be calculated)!
158Wednesday, 12 March 2014 09:52
Vitaly
Now, let's move to "longer tournaments" as stated.
2-days event may use 6-10 sessions, depending on rules, transportation factor (somebody needs to catch a train?), cultural program etc. Sophisticated software (like RiTour.exe) may produce seating for the first 4 session right "on spot", so the first day is "clean" for organisers. Of cause, provided there is no protocol errors.

players forgetting their rulers seemed very common ...

In the World Series of Mahjong in Macao (in which I acted as head judge), we supply mahjong rulers to the players. In the first year, many players forgot and subsequently lost their rulers. In the second year, the judges took special care to remind the players to take their rulers when they leave the table, but still one or two were lost. I'm sorry that I can't help Martin here, but a suggestion to all those who are bringing your prized rulers to any tournament: label (preferably engrave) the ruler with your name! Or even tie the ruler to your pants with a long piece of string. Unless it's a cheap $2 piece you don't mind losing, don't count on your own memory for ruler retrieval!
This is a comment on "A Mahjong Curse"

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